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Posted by Damien Biddulph on Tue 17th Oct 2017

 

  • facebook ceo mark zuckerbergFounder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg.Paul Marotta/Getty Images

 

It looks like Facebook is considering barging in on LinkedIn's turf.

 

Facebook is currently trialling a CV feature, according to screenshots posted on social media — a move that would put it in direct competition with professional social network LinkedIn.

Matt Navarra, director of social media for The Next Web, has shared screenshots of the resume feature sent to him by web developer Jane Manchun Wong, who saw it appear on her Facebook profile.

The feature lets users list their professional experience and education, as well as their contact details, an image, and other information — just like Microsoft-owned LinkedIn does.

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter

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Matt Navarra ⭐️ ✔@MattNavarra

New! Facebook is testing a Resume / CV feature for job hunters

h/t @wongmjane

7:43 PM - Oct 15, 2017 · Wales, United Kingdom

Twitter Ads info and privacy

Of course, it's already possible for people to list their job history and education on Facebook. But do you really want prospective employers to see your private Facebook profile? Instead, the new feature appears to combine all the relevant information into a single, professional-looking package — away from personal photos, status updates, and other Facebook posts people might not wish to share with recruiters and the wider world.

It's not clear how many people currently have access to the resume feature, or what Facebook's ultimate intentions are here. The social network often tests features on a small number of users before rolling them out more widely (or not).

Reached for comment, a Facebook spokesperson confirmed the test, saying in a statement: "At Facebook, we're always building and testing new products and services. We're currently testing a work histories feature to continue to help people find and businesses hire for jobs on Facebook."

But just the fact that Facebook is experimenting with this is further evidence of how the Californian firm is increasingly trying to transcend its roots as a simple social network and move into the professional sector. In 2016, it launches Facebook At Work — now called Workplace — a modified version of Facebook designed for teams in the office to use.

Given Facebook's reputation for trying to crush potential rivals, that ought to make LinkedIn nervous.

Here's how it looks:

facebook linkedin cv resume feature restMatt Navarra/Jane Manchun Wong/Twitter

 

Source: uk.businessinsider.com
 
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Posted by Damien Biddulph on Tue 17th Oct 2017

New trademark application teases prospect of retro gaming on the move

Is Nintendo planning to bring back the classic Game Boy handheld console? New trademark application teases prospect of retro gaming on the move

The original Nintendo Game Boy - let's hope the screen will be bigger on any new one

A TRADEMARK APPLICATION filed by Nintendo has fuelled speculation that the firm could be about to revive the Game Boy. 

The trademark, which was filed on 15 September and uncovered by, er, a Japanese Twitter bot, is accompanied by an image of the classic handheld console (below).

View image on Twitter

View image on Twitter

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商標速報bot @trademark_bot

[商願2017-123766]
商標:[画像] /
出願人:任天堂株式会社 /
出願日:2017年9月15日 /
区分:9(家庭用テレビゲーム機用プログラムほか),14(キーホルダーほか),18(かばん金具ほか),21(化粧用具ほか),25(被服ほか),28(家庭用テレビゲーム…

8:16 AM - Oct 6, 2017

Twitter Ads info and privacy

The trademark doesn't mention the mooted Game Boy Classic by name, but as noted by Gears of Biz, instead covers a variety of merchandising opportunities employing the Game Boy brand including wallets, bags, pouches, clothing, umbrellas and more. So if nothing else, some cool Nintendo swag is probably on its way.

However, the filing also covers programmes and storage "home video game machines' and "portable electronic game machines", hinting that some kind of console could be on the way.

Reviving the Game Boy would be a no-brainer for Nintendo too, especially as 2019 will mark the 30th anniversary of the handheld console. The original Game Boy came out in Japan on 21 April 1989 and began selling in Europe a year later on 28 September 1990. 

What's more, the company's recently-released and easily-hackable NES Classic and SNES Classic consoles both sold out and continue to sell out almost instantaneously.

Back in July, Nintendo filed a trademark showing a controller for the N64, suggesting that the company has yet more plans to revive another of its classic consoles. 

And after the Nintendo Game Boy, how about resurrecting the Nintendo Virtual Boy

Source: v3.co.uk
 
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Posted by Damien Biddulph on Tue 17th Oct 2017

Dorsey promises "more aggressive stance" on rules and enforcement

Jack Dorsey promises Twitter crackdown on terrorist accounts

Twitter has pledged to crackdown further on the use of the network by terrorists. 

CEO Jack Dorsey announced the new crackdown today, which follows on from a number of initiatives intended to reinvigorate the moribund social networking tool. 

It's not the first time that Twitter has pledged to crackdown on the use of Twitter by terrorist organisations. However, Dorsey has now added that the company plans to implement stronger enforcement systems, along with a much tougher 'disciplinary' process.

Of course, he did this all over Twitter in a 'Tweet storm'.

"We see voices being silenced on Twitter every day," he tweeted.

He continued: "We've been working to counteract this for the past two years. We prioritised this in 2016. We updated our policies and increased the size of our teams. It wasn't enough. In 2017 we made it our top priority and made a lot of progress.

"Today we saw voices silencing themselves and voices speaking out because we're *still* not doing enough. We've been working intensely over the past few months and focused today on making some critical decisions.

"We decided to take a more aggressive stance in our rules and how we enforce them. New rules around: unwanted sexual advances, non-consensual nudity, hate symbols, violent groups, and tweets that glorifies violence."

All this will start to happen over the next couple of weeks. 

Source: v3.co.uk
 
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Posted by Damien Biddulph on Tue 17th Oct 2017

A team of US researchers have confirmed that an exploit can hack into any WPA-2 wireless network, but details are slim

World WiFi at risk from KRACK

Those padlocks have suddenly become less reassuring

The WPA2 encryption that protects almost all WiFi networks has been cracked - meaning that wireless networks are even less safe than before.

A team led by the US government will give full details later today, Monday, but have already confirmed that an exploit known as KRACK is able to break through the encryption layer, putting anything into the plain sight of hackers.

The US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US0CERT) has confirmed that using WPA-2 makes you a target and that's pretty bad because the majority of home routers don't have anything stronger.

Or to put it another way - if you use WiFi, you're a sitting duck.

At this stage, we're not sure how easy it is for a hacker to use KRACK, and so the scale of the problem is still somewhat up in the air. If it involves being within the range of your WiFi network for an hour, then it's less of a worry. If it's instant, then someone could attack you in a slow-moving car.

And that's not such an unlikely scenario - when WPA (1) was cracked back in 2009, it took a minute to slap down the data.

WPA2 has been so far from the back of people's minds it has hardly been mentioned on these hallowed pages, save for a portent of doom via a Virgin WiFi hack in July.

The full warning so far reads: "US-CERT has become aware of several key management vulnerabilities in the 4-way handshake of the Wi-Fi Protected Access II (WPA2) security protocol. 

"The impact of exploiting these vulnerabilities includes decryption, packet replay, TCP connection hijacking, HTTP content injection, and others. Note that as protocol-level issues, most or all correct implementations of the standard will be affected. The CERT/CC and the reporting researcher KU Leuven, will be publicly disclosing these vulnerabilities on 16 October 2017."

In other words, this is as bad as it gets. It has the potential to be Heartbleed on steroids (or on KRACK, if you insist) and there's pretty much nothing any of us can do about it, because no one has been really focusing on what would happen if it was.

Full details (and therefore how much we should worry) will appear later at krackattacks.com before a formal presentation of researcher findings at a talk called "Key Reinstallation Attacks: Forcing Nonce Reuse in WPA2" (yes that's really what it's called) at the ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security in Dallas on 1 November.

Source: v3.co.uk
 
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Posted by Damien Biddulph on Mon 16th Oct 2017

richard branson hyperloopRichard Branson (center) stands in front of the Hyperloop at Hyperloop One's test site in Nevada. Virgin Group

Hyperloop One just struck a major deal with Richard Branson's Virgin Group.

Virgin Group announced Thursday that it has invested in Hyperloop One, a startup that's working on constructing the high-speed transit system Elon Musk first outlined in a white paper in 2013. The terms of the deal weren't disclosed, but the investment was significant enough that Hyperloop One will now be called Virgin Hyperloop.

"After visiting Hyperloop One’s test site in Nevada and meeting its leadership team this past summer, I am convinced this groundbreaking technology will change transportation as we know it and dramatically cut journey times," Virgin Group founder Richard Branson said in a press release.

Hyperloop One is headed by Shervin Pishevar, a Silicon Valley venture capitalist best known as an early investor in Uber. The Los Angeles-based startup is conducting feasibility studies in Dubai and Finland for the transit system. US cities like Denver and Nevada have alsosubmitted proposals for the construction of a Hyperloop.

The Hyperloop is a nascent transportation system that works by shooting pods through a vacuumed-sealed tube at speeds that experts say could reach 700 mph. 

The company has conducted two successful tests of its Hyperloop system on its 500-meter development track in Nevada.

In August, the Hyperloop traveled almost the entire length of the track and reached a top speed of 192 mph. It reached a top speed of 70 mph after traveling 300 feet a month prior. The company still needs to demonstrate that the system could transport people on tracks long enough to connect cities.

 

Source: uk.businessinsider.com
 
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Posted by Damien Biddulph on Mon 16th Oct 2017

 

Sergey BrinGoogle cofounder Sergey Brin with a Loon balloon.Yudhi Mahatma/Antara Foto/Reuters

Alphabet has quietly upgraded its internet balloon initiative from a research lab "project" to an official corporation, setting the stage for what could be the latest standalone business to spin out from Google's parent company.

Project Loon, which develops solar-powered balloons that beam internet access down to earth, has been incorporated as Loon Inc, according to regulatory filings. 

Business Insider first noticed Loon was listed as "Loon Inc." in a recent filing to the FCC seeking permission to float Loon balloons above Puerto Rico and provide internet access to areas affected by hurricane Maria. Previously, Loon was officially referred to as a project under Alphabet, or under X, the Alphabet subsidiary dedicated to creating ambitious "moonshot" technologies.

Loon's incorporation is a sign that Alphabet may be preparing to spin Loon out of the X division and let it operate as its own company. Alphabet went through a similar process last year with Waymo, the company formed out of X's self-driving car project. X also spun out Dandelion, a geothermal energy company, earlier this year, but Dandelion is not under the Alphabet umbrella.

A Loon spokesperson declined to comment.

Next candidate

One person close to X told Business Insider a few months ago that Loon was the next likely candidate for a spin out of X. In February, Alphabet X's business tapped Alastair Westgarth, a telecom industry veteran, to be the new CEO of Project Loon

Getting spun out from the mothership often indicates that Alphabet believes an experimental technology or product has matured enough to be ready for commercialization. That gives the spinout company the freedom to pursue its own business objectives, while at the same time subjecting it to the financial pressures of an independent business.

Google has previously said that it believes Loon's "floating cell towers in the sky" could one day become a business that generates billions of dollars in revenue. So far however, Loon has only seen limited deployments in areas like Sri Lanka, Peru, and more recently Puerto Rico.

As a standalone company, Loon would join a growing roster of Alphabet subsidiaries, known as "Other Bets," such as high-speed internet service Access, smart appliance maker Nest and Waymo, the self-driving car company. In the second quarter of the year, Alphabet's Other Bets posted an operating loss of $772 million, on revenue of $248 million.

Spencer Hosie, a lawyer representing Loon competitor SpaceData in a lawsuit, told Business Insider that he noticed the change in Loon's status in the recent FCC filing. Hosie said he plans to add Loon Inc. as a defendant in SpaceData's case against Alphabet. It's unclear when exactly Alphabet incorporated Loon, but Hosie said he suspected that it could have been as recently as last week.

Julie Bort contributed to this report. 

Source: uk.businessinsider.com
 
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Posted by Damien Biddulph on Mon 16th Oct 2017

New Nokia Android flagship from HMD Global should be out in the next six weeks

Everything we know about the upcoming Nokia 9 smartphone: no headphone jack and a bezel-free display

 

HMD Global's upcoming Nokia 9 flagship Android smartphone will have a near-bezel-free display but, like many flagship phones released these days, won't bear a standard headphone jack. 

And, with the device set to be launched before the end of the year - realistically, within the next six weeks - 3D renders have been leaked and published by @OnLeaks for CompareRaja

They show that, in addition to the bezel-less display and lack of headphone jack, the Nokia 9 will sport both a curved screen and rear, similar to last year's Galaxy S7 Edge

 

It'll be shorter than the S7 Edge, though, with measurements of 150.9x72.6x7.7mm, which suggests it'll sport smaller bezels above and below its rumoured 5.5in QHD display.

The screen doesn't look quite as bezel-free as that on the Galaxy S8, though, but it is bezel-free enough that the fingerprint scanner has been moved to the rear of the device. This sits alongside a vertically-aligned dual-lens camera, which CompareRaja notes will likely weight in at "12 or 13MP". 

The renders also show that, like the Google Pixel 2, HMD Global will ditch the 3.5mm headphone jack in favour of audio over USB-C. 

If the Nokia 8 is anything to go by, the Nokia 9 will arrive running Android 7.1.1, and HMD's largely-unobtrusive user interface likely means that it'll be promptly updated to Android 8.0. 

Elsewhere, specs are said to include the Snapdragon 835 processor, 4GB of RAM and 64/128GB onboard storage options, and the Nokia 9 is also expected to be HMD's first smartphone to feature a built-in iris scanner. ComparaRaja notes that OZO audio and array of mics for active noise cancellation will also likely be included.

There's no word yet as to when the Nokia 9 will become official, but earlier rumours point to a launch in the fourth quarter, which realistically means before the end of November, at the latest. 

 

Source: v3.co.uk
 
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Posted by Damien Biddulph on Mon 16th Oct 2017

People should have more confidence in their innate 'wisdom', says Ma, at Alibaba cloud computing event

AI won't take your job but it might mean four-day working weeks, says Alibaba's Jack Ma

Alibaba founder Jack Ma

Billionaire Alibaba entrepreneur Jack Ma has said that artificial intelligence won't make human beings redundant in a keynote speech at Alibaba Cloud's Computing Conference in Hangzhou, China. 

Ma's attitude to AI is contrary to some of the more apocalyptic warnings from Western technology entrepreneurs such as Bill Gates and Elon Musk, not to mention physicist Stephen Hawking

Ma argued that human beings ought to have more confidence in their abilities, particularly the ‘wisdom' they possess that AI will never have.

 

"People are getting more worried about the future, about technology replacing humans, eliminating jobs and widening the gap between the rich and the poor," said Ma. "But I think these are empty worries. Technology exists for people. We worry about technology because we lack confidence in ourselves, and imagination for the future."

Ma, quoted in the Alibaba-owned South China Morning Post, added that humans possess one thing that cannot be programmed. "People will always surpass machines because people possess wisdom," he said.

That wisdom, he added, is reflected not by the losses of the world's best Go players to the IA-powered AlphaGo computer, but in the creation of the game in the first place. "AlphaGo should compete against AlphaGo 2.0, not us. There's no need to be upset that we lost. It shows that we're smart, because we created it," he said.

However, while humanity isn't about to be handed a collective P45 by an intelligent robot, it could start to enjoy much shorter working weeks as more intelligent tools are adopted, conjectured Ma.

Some time within the next 30 years, he suggested, people will have both shorter working weeks and shorter working days - but still feel busier than ever.

"My grandfather worked 16 hours a day on a farm and felt that he was very busy. He had only one day off a week. I have two days off a week, I work for eight hours a day, and I feel even busier than my grandfather," he said.

Ma joins Mark Zuckerberg and Linus Torvalds on the more optimistic side of the AI/apocalypse debate.

Ultimately, thought, Ma said that no-one really knows what the future will hold. "Anything that can be clearly defined is not the future. When faced with the future, we're all kids; no one's an expert," he said.

Source: v3.co.uk
 
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Posted by Damien Biddulph on Wed 11th Oct 2017

Data protection is an essential component in any data management strategy, and one that all system and storage administrators should fully embrace.

We take backups for various reasons: hardware can fail, software has bugs, and users make mistakes and delete or change data unintentionally.

There is also the risk of deliberate and malicious attempts to destroy or encrypt data for financial gain or to “get back” at a previous employer.

People say you only find out how good your insurance cover is when you make a claim. With backups, we don’t want to wait until we need to restore data to find out whether our backups are any good.

Data recovery can be a stressful scenario that doesn’t need the additional pressure of worrying whether backups are valid or not.

The solution, of course, is to test that backups have worked by restoring data.

Historically, this was a difficult and time-consuming task that was limited in terms of what was possible.

When there was a physical server for each application, restoring data meant having additional hardware on which to perform the restore process. It was not possible or practical to recover to the production environment in anything other than a limited way.

So a full restore of an entire platform was rarely done. Other reasons included the conflict of the restored system with the production one – of which more later.

Read more on backup

But with the widespread adoption of virtualisation, things have become much easier.

virtual machine (VM) is just a set of files that contain the operating system and data of the VM, plus details on VM configuration (processor count, memory, network, and so on). This means that a VM can easily be recovered from backups and powered up to validate that the application can be recovered and made accessible.

It is worth remembering that testing the restore of an application provides two purposes. First, it validates that the restore does actually work. Second, it provides a benchmark to ensure that the recovery process can be completed within agreed service levels – mainly recovery time objectives (RTOs).

Regular testing can be provided back to the business to show that application recovery targets can be met, or perhaps reviewed if the process cannot be completed in time.

Backups: What to test?

At this point, we should think about exactly what we want to recover as part of a test. There are multiple levels to consider: 

  • File recovery – Can I recover individual files from the backup? This process is easy to apply to physical and virtual servers, as well as backups of file servers. The choice of data to recover really depends on what data is being stored. It could make sense to recover the same file each time, or to recover new data each time. Automation can have a benefit here, which we will cover later.
  • VM recovery – Can I bring back a virtual machine and power it up? This is clearly one for virtual environments, rather than physical ones. Recovering a virtual machine image is relatively easy, but consideration has to be given to where the VM will be powered up. Starting the VM on the same production environment brings up immediate issues of network IP conflicts, and SID conflicts for Windows systems. There may also be issues with whatever application services the VM offers. The choice here is to power up the VM in an isolated environment (which can be done using a “DMZ” subnet on the hypervisor) and provide access only through that DMZ network. Be aware that powering up recovered VMs with new IDs may have an impact on application licensing. Check with your software provider on what the terms and conditions allow.
  • Physical recovery – Physical server recovery is more complex and depends on the configuration of the platform. Some servers may boot from SAN, whereas others may have local boot disks. The recovery process then depends on the configuration. Recovering an application to alternative hardware removes a lot of risk, but it does not fully represent the recovery process. Recovering an application to the running hardware means an outage and so the test is likely to have more risk and be carried out less frequently.
  • Data recovery – Depending on the backup process, data recovery can be an option in testing. For example, if data in a database is backed up at the application level (rather than the entire VM), then data can be restored to a test recovery server and accessed in an isolated environment.
  • Application recovery – Full application testing can be more complex because it relies on understanding the relationships between individual VMs and physical servers. Again, recovering a suite of servers as part of full application testing is best done in an isolated environment with separate networking.

It is clear that more extensive testing has impact and risk, but can provide more reassuring results. Choosing a recovery test scenario depends on the backup and restore methodology in use. If the recovery process is to restore an entire VM, then that is what the test needs to do. If the recovery process means rebuilding a VM and recovering the data, then that is what the test process should reflect.

Backups: How often to test

How often should testing be performed? In an ideal world, a test should be scheduled after every backup to validate that the data has been successfully secured. This is not always practical, so there is a trade-off to be made between the impact and effort of recovery and having a degree of confidence in the restore.

As a minimum, there are four options: 

  • As part of a regular cycle (for example, monthly). Schedule a restore test for each application on a regular interval.
  • When an application changes significantly (patches, upgrades, for instance). Schedule a (more comprehensive) restore test when significant changes have been made to an application, such as upgrading to a new software release or when installing a major patch package or operating system change.
  • When application data changes significantly. If an application has a regular import of data from an external source, for example, performing a test restore can help validate timings for data recovery.
  • When a new application is built. This means testing the restore of a new VM or server when first created. This may seem excessive, but it makes sense to ensure that the server/VM has been added to the backup schedule.

The ability to test recovery can be significantly improved by the use of automation. At the most basic level, this can mean scripting the restore of individual files. But more complex testing can be done with the use of software tools, many of which are integrated into backup software products.

Veeam and Zerto are two companies that provide the ability to automate the testing of restores without affecting the production environment.

Suppliers such as Rubrik and Cohesity offer dedicated hardware platforms to manage backup data and can be used as a temporary datastore for recovered VMs. This allows recovery to be scripted and automated relatively easily.

These solutions are mostly focused around VM recovery, so more complex scenarios (such as recovering a Microsoft Exchange platform) may need additional manual steps (especially to confirm the application is actually working). This means setting some definitions around what successful recovery looks like – either the ability to get back individual files or, at the most detailed level, the ability to access the application being recovered.

Future strategies

As we move into a hybrid cloud world and increasing use of containers, backup testing offers challenges and opportunities. Having public cloud as a backup target allows applications to be recovered and tested in the cloud, reducing on-premise costs. Containers represent a new application deployment paradigm, so will have challenges around backup and restore. As we move forward, the fundamentals remain the same – check your backups regularly and ensure recovery processes are well documented.

Source: computerweekly.com
 
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Posted by Damien Biddulph on Wed 11th Oct 2017

Computer Weekly talks to Mathieu Gorge of Vigitrust about the practical impacts on data storage of the GDPR concepts of “personally identifiable data” and “the right to be forgotten”

The European Union (EU) General Data Protection Regulation(GDPR) is set to come into force in May 2018.

Key to GDPR compliance – with relation to retention of data and storage – are the importance of personally identifiable data and the right to be forgotten.

Meanwhile, the right to be forgotten allows individuals to request that data be deleted without “undue delay”.

All this places onerous requirements on how organisations retain data, as well as their ability to find and deal with it.

In this podcast, ComputerWeekly.com storage editor Antony Adshead talks with CEO of Vigitrust, Mathieu Gorge, about the implications for storage of GDPR’s requirements on personally identifiable data and the right to be forgotten.

Download this podcast

Antony Adshead: How do we ensure we can locate personal data?

Mathieu Gorge: First of all you need to define what personally identifiable data is in GDPR. Essentially, it is any type of data that could put any type of data subject in Europe at risk, whether you store, process or work on that data in the EU or not.

The key challenge that we’re seeing in the market right now is that most organisations do not know where the data is or what type of data they have.

For example, do they have data that is covered by GDPR, do they have other data that is not covered by GDPR, do they take credit card holder data, do they take protected health information data, and where is that data located?

Where within their ecosystem can they find it? Is it on their on network, their subsidiaries, do they exchange data with partners, suppliers, cloud applications and so on?

So, to do that what they need to put in place is a data discovery exercise that will allow them to map out where data covered by GDPR is located, where it is coming from, where it is going to, [and] what what kind of processing it is taking on.

Then they can classify the data and use some tools to do that and move onto the next level, which is how to manage access to that data in such a way that I guarantee under GDPR I have taken what is known as “appropriate security measures” to protect the data, and ensure that I know at any given time that the data is fairly and appropriately managed and protected.

Adshead: How can we enable the right to be forgotten in storage systems?

Gorge: It’s worth going over what that right to be forgotten causes.

The idea is that under the eight principles of data protection you need to obtain data and process it fairly; you only need to keep it for one or more specified explicit and legal purposes; you can only disclose it in ways that are compatible with these purposes; it needs to be kept safe and secure, accurate, complete and up to date; and you need to ensure it is adequate and relevant.

What’s really important in those principles is the fact that you can only retain it for the amount of time that is necessary for the purpose, and you need to give a copy of the personal data to the individual on request and ensure that – if they tell you they no longer want you or allow you to have that data – it can be erased.

Read more about GDPR

And so, the right to be forgotten is really about putting in place the right processes, the right technology and the right training in your organisation to make sure that [you can fulfil a request] if someone says to you, ‘I no longer want you to have the data’ or ‘The data that you have about me is no longer accurate, I want you to take corrective action’.

That corrective action could be, ‘Please erase the data’, or it could be, ‘Please update the data to the appropriate level of data’.

And so, I go back to the previous question, which is that you need to be able to locate your data, you need to have data classification in such a way that if someone rings you and says, ‘I want you to delete that data because it is no longer accurate’, or, ‘You are using the data for a purpose that is no longer the purpose I gave you consent for’, then you need to be able to take action fairly quickly.

I think we will see that the regulators in the EU will look at the right to be forgotten as one of the main topics when they start to enforce GDPR.

Adshead: When will GDPR actually come into force?

Gorge: May 2018, although some European member states have already brought that forward and put GDPR into their own regulation ahead of May 2018.

So, again the advice is if you are not in compliance, you should at least be able to demonstrate that you have a roadmap to compliance by May 2018.

Source: computerweekly.com
 
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